Asthma, Cancer, Heart Disease, Kidney Failure, Addiction, Hypertension, Stroke, Psoriasis, Diabetes, Epilepsy, Allergy, Paralysis

Fanita Mendoza de Perez' Story

Piura, Peru
South America

“Richardson-Steele-Olszewski” Syndrome

In the year 2000, Fanita suffered an automobile accident. Slowly, she was recovering from the accident, but she could not walk nor stand. In 2002, she traveled to France where further tests were done. She was diagnosed with the so-called “Richardson-Steele-Olszewski” Syndrome, an irreversible motor dysfunction caused by damage to certain nervous cells in the brain. She was confined to a wheelchair for the rest of her life.

Her muscles were deteriorating day by day. She also suffered from irritability, constipation, nervousness, heaviness and rigidity of the body. She could only keep her eyes half-open. She could not move by herself; she could not eat or get dressed by herself; she stuttered and had difficulty swallowing.
Then she came to Peru. She now practices the Homa fires. After 7 days, we started seeing positive changes in her. Her assistant did Agnihotra in her presence in the morning and evening. She participates in the Om Tryambakam Homa in the “Cayetano Heredia” Hospital. She attends the “Women’s Homa Healing Circle” on Thursdays. Twice a week we do Agnihotra in her home. She also takes Agnihotra ash daily which has enabled her to overcome the problem of constipation. Now, after three months with Homa Therapy, she is able to walk with a little help. She is more agile, she speaks fluently, and keeps a smile on her face (before she seemed angry) and enjoys doing all the Homa fires on her own. She is on her way to a great recovery. With her agile movements she says: “I am alive again. ” Fanita lives every day with enthusiasm, overlooking the difficult moments that are always there. The whole family appreciates her healing and is grateful to Homa Therapy.

Picture on left: Fanny Mendoza came in her wheelchair to her first Homa Therapy session at the Homa Center in Piura, Peru.
Picture on right: Fanny Mendoza slowly starting to walk.

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